• Tanya S Osensky

Contracts are Marketing Documents - Part 1

Many small businesses head to the internet to find a contract template or ask their friends to give them a contract they can copy and use in their business.


But they’re missing a great marketing opportunity.


What they don’t recognize is that contracts are an expression of their company brand. And it’s a key component of the overall marketing strategy.


Think about it for a moment. Have you ever received a contract that has been poorly drafted with spelling errors, or the font is different in one paragraph compared to the next? Perhaps it looks fairly polished at first glance, but looks were deceiving and on closer inspection the contract doesn’t include important provisions. Would it make you hesitate before proceeding?


Just like a company website, logo and business cards, a contract is also part of the brand. When a business uses any ol’ contract they find online it sends a message that they figured that having something is better than nothing. Sloppiness points to lack of professionalism. It not only damages the brand but also (and maybe even worse) clients can take advantage of such weaknesses.


Contracts should mirror the company’s brand and be considered a part of its overall marketing strategy. Not only should they be well-drafted and well-organized, but they should be part of a simple signature process, using features like electronic signature.


A great contract and an easy-to-sign process help create a perception of the excellent work that the company will provide and sets it apart from its competition.


In other words, even contracts should be part of the overall marketing strategy.

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